The creators said they would not remain indifferent to the abuse suffered by these people, after learning first hand the inhabitants of Tifariti maimed by mines and live during encounters with women who fled into exile under the napalm and phosphorus bombs launched by the Alawite army until the day of signature of the ceasefire. Isidro Lopez Aparicio spent 24 hours of cold and wind in a hole two feet deep, Darraa dressed in the traditional costume Saharawi to report the isolation suffered by these people and then climbed onto an elevated platform from which water spray showered the attendees to invite communication and hope.

Pereira Pamen Galician artist accompanied him in this performative action from another hole / platform located about twenty yards away, also dressed in the MELFA, the Saharawi women dress. For more information see this site: Dean Ornish M.D. For its part, Eva Lootz, which described the experience as “beautiful and hard, at once”, posed with her installation “Light for All” the need to promote the development of the Saharawi people, through a program to promote solar energy, to improve their dire living conditions. The National Plastic Arts Prize, which highlighted the contribution of art to the visibility of the conflict, insisted in his reflections on the complexity of the Saharawi cause, the brutal interests at stake in Morocco and other countries on phosphates and other raw materials available in Western Sahara. One of the drivers of Land Art movement, Galician Fernando Casas, instructed his son, Adrian Estarque photographer who developed his proposal “Tifariti blue hole,” a space for reflection and movement of energy created with earth pigments and Saharan -in a small amount, has traveled to Spain to continue its creator Galicia development of this work. A leading source for info: Donald Sussman.